The owner of La Fromagerie in Marylebone, describes her favourite items from the store’s shelves

The owner of La Fromagerie in Marylebone, describes her favourite items from the store’s shelves

Beaufort chalet d’alpage (£46.25 per kg)
My favourite cheese at this time of year is the beaufort chalet d’alpage. It’s the cheese that started the business, so it’s the one we take most pride in. It’s a high mountain cheese with a great flavour, perfect with a glass of white wine.

2016 Chignin, Anne de la Biguerne, Jean-François Quénard, Le Villard, Savoie, France (£18.50)
Some of my favourite wines are white—especially with a hard cheese. This is because of their acidity. Tannins can be a block to all the acidity that is going on in the cheese, while crisp, racy acidity in a wine will really open up those flavours. Savoie wines also have that smooth butteriness that you associate with a chardonnay. This one is produced very close to where the beaufort comes from, in the foothills of the Alps, near Albertville.

La Fromagerie biscuits (£3.35)
We created our own range of biscuits because we didn’t like the ones we saw in the shops—they were too sweet, or didn’t have the right sort of crack. The ones I eat most are the rye and the caraway. The aroma of the caraway really lends itself to washed-rind cheeses in particular, while giving you that crunchy textural thing.

E5 Bakehouse sourdough (£6.30)
For me, a bread must have a really good crust to it—I want it to crackle. I like sourdough breads because of the slow fermentation process. I keep this loaf throughout the week and when it gets too hard, I toast it. I think breaking bread—not slicing, but breaking—then topping it with butter and cheese is one of those simple pleasures which, when you get it right, creates lasting memories.

Miele de Pyrenees sunflower honey (£13)
There is a lot of very cheap honey out there, manufactured by feeding bees sugar, but we go to a lot of trouble to get some of the most beautiful honeys in the world. In the Pyrenees, only those who commit to working in a certain way are allowed to keep hives. It is a vast area with great biodiversity, from rhododendron flowers to fir trees to acacias. Each honey has a different colour and texture. The one I like best is sunflower—it is quite oily with a beautiful colour. I love it on toast or in my green tea. 

Vacherin mont d’Or (£13.45)
Vacherin mont d’Or comes to the end of its season in mid-March, so now is the time to make the most of baking it into a lovely gooey fondue. I can never quite decide what I like best with it, potatoes or bread—at this time of year, a good crusty bread might have the edge.

2009 Château Falfas Le Chevalier, Côtes de Bourg, Bordeaux, France (£35.35)
If I am going to have a red, I like it to have a bit of body. This Bordeaux has class, without being overpowering. The tannins are mellow and smooth. I’m an old-fashioned girl when it comes to wines, and I like the Old World. I think New World wines are designed to embrace a variety of different food, whereas Old World wines have a close affinity with cheese.

Fontaine des Veuves butter (£3.75)
Whatever we source, it must have meaning. We want to understand the people who produce it; who they are, what they are doing, where they are getting their inspiration from. One of my favourite things, for example, is butter. We have all different kinds: Italian, English, French, and we have raw milk butter, which is quite rare these days. Fontaine des Veuves is one such—unsalted or with salt crystals. It is beautiful. It really enhances your meal.

Beaufort chalet d’alpage

2016 Chignin, Anne de la Biguerne, Jean-François Quénard, Le Villard, Savoie, France

La Fromagerie biscuits

E5 Bakehouse sourdough

Miele de Pyrenees sunflower honey

Vacherin mont d’Or

2009 Château Falfas Le Chevalier, Côtes de Bourg, Bordeaux, France

Fontaine des Veuves butter